Wreck of the Week

Another rusting relic this week for the corrosion fans to enjoy.

The idea came after reading the property website:
http://www.wreckoftheweek.co.uk/

I thought that something should exist for cars, buses, vans, lorries and motorcycles.

When I look into it the nation’s favourite auction site is casting up many dozen examples of rusting relics. Many that require extreme bravery and much metalworking skill.

This week’s wreck is a piece of German manufacturing history:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Mercedes-Fintail-220-LHD-Restoration-Project-or-Spares/323003442386

It is located apparently in Arboleas, Spain

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One of the advantages of Spain (from a metal perspective) of course is that it is beautifully dry.

s-l1600
 

That is not to say that signs of the corrosion beetle are absent. The sills on this example look worthy of some close attention.

Although listed as suitable for spares I am not certain what spares you will be able to glean.

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For a start there are no doors and the car interior is more like a shed. The seats are squeezed into it and look torn and stained.

Fortunately front and rear glass is in place.

Confusingly the listing states the registration date is 08/10/1964. But in the same description also maintains that it is a 1967 Mercedes 220.

I’m not certain how those two things can coexist.

The 220 reputation is for being bullet proof. Indeed the body on this seems to have survived moderately well.

But a lot of parts are missing – this picture has no sign of an engine for example.

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It looks like this car was a donor in the past. One of those magnificent stacked headlights is missing. As is the proud chrome grill.

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A quick scan of the Internet reveals that the 220 is well served with parts however https://www.niemoeller.de/en/mercedes-benz-oldtimer-spare-parts/spare-parts-catalog-mercedes-benz-170-220.

I’m taken by the location which looks like a cross between a wasteland and a prison yard in these photographs.

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The price seems low at £500 (currently with no bids). But a better prospect is https://www.classiccarsforsale.co.uk/mercedes-benz/220/223226 at €4,850. (Although it lacks the stacked headlights I notice.

This one looks even better https://www.classic-trader.com/uk/cars/listing/mercedes-benz/fintail/200/1967/117659 at £22,098.

So it does look like these 200s fetch a reasonable sum.

However at the end of any restoration you would still have a left hand drive car.

It does look as if Right Hand Drive versions are not rare https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Mercedes-220-SEB-W111-FINTAIL-STACKED-HEADLIGHT-MODEL-1963-/222789612102?_trksid=p2141725.m3641.l6368.

Sadly the chances of rescue for this old girl are not looking high. At least not in the UK (There are no bids at the time of writing).

Although it would be marvellous to be proved wrong. And to see the before and after photographs.

Wreck of the Week

Not a lot of feedback this week.

I seem to have more people reading the blog who are keen on a) the writing material b) the counselling material.

However I will persist with this on the basis that the rust aficionados are not quite so outspoken.

The concept is based upon the property website:

http://www.wreckoftheweek.co.uk/

Although I feel that there should be something similar for things with an engine.

This week has had so many potential examples of wrecks that I was struggling to know what to choose.

That is until my partner pointed out that this week’s car is a “gangster car” which meant it was the top choice.

I have no firm feelings about what a “gangster car” should look like so this one may well fit the bill better than most.

This is the car I’m talking about:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1953-ALVIS-TC21-FOR-TOTAL-RESTORATION-MANUAL-GEARBOX-DELIVERY-POSSIBLE-/122865998941

Unlike last week this one is a classified ad so that I can only guess at what it finally fetched.

On the upside it is very well served with photographs.

These give a very good idea about what is involved in restoring it.

I have little familiarity with Alvis. So I thought this time I would take a quick look around to see what they are, how desirable they are and so on.

Wreck 1

It turns out that all car production ceased in 1965 which is a bit before I was born.

The likelihood of significant replacement panels being available is unlikely.

From the above photograph the front bumper might stand re-chroming. But there is a lot of rust worm obvious in front of the driver’s side front wing.

The TC21 was noted for its bonnet scoops – which this one is missing.

Perhaps only one variant actually had them.

Wreck 2

It looks like production was between 1953 and 1955 only. At 1953 this is an early one.

Those running boards look like they are going to need significant attention.

A quick scan of the available TC21 cars out there reveals that £20,000 – £45,000 is needed to buy a good one.

So perhaps this justifies the interest in this.

Wreck 3

However there is no V5 and only the seller’s say-so that getting hold of one is straightforward.

Of greater interest in any case are the fabrication skills that you’re going to need to resurrect this car.

It looks though like a number of TC21s are now on wire wheels. So the steel wheels – and what look like good condition tyres are a bit of a surprise.

Wreck 4

This side view is a lot more revealing.

The rear wing is apparently attached by prayer and the boot surround needing a touch of magic.

I do love the rear wheel arch covers though – give a look of style to the car, although I bet they are a devil to keep clean.

Wreck 5

The boot floor in need of more than a polish.

The lack of underside shots means we have to speculate about the chassis’ condition.

I notice that some Alvis cars were built with an ash frame. I’m not clear if it includes the TC21.

If it does welding might well be the least of the problems that you would have to encounter.

Wreck 6

The nearside view doesn’t look any more awe-inspiring than the offside.

It definitely looks like it is going to need some specialist skills to put that back.

Wreck 7

The engine though looks amazing; apparently a 3 litre and 100bhp in the day.

Despite having the aerodynamics of a cocktail cabinet it could apparently reach 100mph.

Piling along at 100mph in a mobile stately home is an achievement particularly in 1953.

Twin SUs at least look like the kind of thing that can be recovered in 2018.

Wreck 8

Perhaps we should focus on the interior:

Wreck 9

Oh dear it looks like Mr and Mrs Mouse moved in a little while ago and fancied a meal of leather and horsehair.

No escape from a complete reupholster from the looks of this.

Wreck 10

But what a dashboard and what door cappings, a period of style and grace which it appears worthwhile trying to recapture (if your pockets are deep enough).

I love how far the speedo is from the driver as if watching one’s speed is for lesser people.

Wreck 11

And lastly another view of that engine.

It looks like it was on for £3750. So there is some ceiling for that £22,000 asking price.

But with this quantity of work I have to hope the buyer is very skilled as that could be swallowed in bodyshop fees.

It would be sad if it had only been purchased to supply parts for another TC21.